Podcast 2 – Creativity Matters

“Building a Legacy” is a new three-part series on “That’s What I Call Marketing,” in partnership with Legacy Communications. This is episode two: Creativity Matters.
Legacy Communications 3 part podcast series.

In this series we will deep dive into the evolving world of communications and how Legacy Communications are shaping the future through a constant appetite to explore the world around them.

In episode two, Creativity Matters, host Conor Byrne sits down with Aidan Mc Laughlin, Director of Brand & Advertising at Indeed, and Legacy Communications’ Claire O’Grady, Director of Creativity and Strategy, and Micheal Brennan, Head of Search, to discuss:

  • the evolving landscape of creativity.
  • how we can and should have both fast and slow creative at play.
  • why processes do matter when it comes to creativity and why Legacy have built an in-depth ‘Better Thinking’ process to help everyone play a role in generating better thinking.
  • why it’s a good reminder to be playful and fun too when you are ideating.
  • fast and agile creative and how while it can deliver really powerful results; tread with caution as moving too fast can be dangerous.
  • the role of AI and how humans still produce the best ideas.

Legacy podcast number 2 - Creativity Matters.

You can listen to this Podcast on Apple here: Building a Legacy Episode Two: Creativity Matters

You can listen to this Podcast on Spotify here: Building a Legacy Episode Two: Creativity Matters

You can watch this on YouTube below or here: Building a Legacy Episode Two – Creativity Matters

If you missed Episode One of this three part series, you can still watch it here. Host Conor Byrne sits down with Bernard Brogan, co-founder of Legacy Communications, and Kevin Moore, Managing Director of Legacy Communications, to share the fascinating journey of their agency from its inception to becoming a renowned name in the industry.

You can listen to this Podcast on Apple here: Building a Legacy Episode One – Building an Agency

You can listen to this Podcast on Spotify here: Building a Legacy Episode One – Building an Agency

You can watch this on YouTube here: Building a Legacy Episode One – Building an Agency

Podcast 1 – Building an Agency

“Building a Legacy” is a new three-part series on “That’s What I Call Marketing,” in partnership with Legacy Communications.

Podcast episode 1: Building a Legacy

In this series we will deep dive into the evolving world of communications and how Legacy Communications are shaping the future through a constant appetite to explore the world around them.

In Episode One of this three part series, host Conor Byrne sits down with Bernard Brogan, co-founder of Legacy Communications, and Kevin Moore, Managing Director of Legacy Communications, to share the fascinating journey of their agency from its inception to becoming a renowned name in the industry.

Host Conor Byrne sits down with Bernard Brogan, co-founder, and Kevin Moore, MD, of Legacy Communications.

You can listen to this Podcast on Apple here: Building a Legacy Episode One – Building an Agency

You can listen to this Podcast on Spotify here: Building a Legacy Episode One – Building an Agency

You can watch this on Youtube here: Building a Legacy Episode One – Building an Agency

 

According to AI, Males Dominate the Professional Workforce

Exploring gender bias in AI: Why does AI assume most leaders are men?

Recent research conducted by Legacy Communications explored how AI-generated images exhibit a troubling gender bias when tasked with creating workplace images.

To conduct the research, Legacy Communications used an AI natural language processing tool to generate prompts that were fed into an AI image generator to create images of typical professional roles.

The language processing tool was asked to describe different job roles, with the prompts being carefully crafted to avoid any potential bias that would influence the image. The prompt created by the AI NLP tool was then pasted into an AI image generation tool, which was asked to produce specific images based on the given prompt.

As an example, the researchers at Legacy asked the tool to give them a prompt to create an image of a CEO, which resulted in the following response from the AI:

“imagine a powerful and confident CEO in a modern office setting. The CEO is dressed in professional attire, exuding authority and leadership. The background features a stylish office with large windows, a sleek desk, and contemporary decor. Capture the essence of success and professionalism in the CEO’s demeanour.”

When given the prompt, the AI image generator created 2 images of a man as exhibited in the image below:

A male CEO sitting behind his desk wearing a suit.

Image 1: A male CEO is wearing professional attire, and is depicted sitting behind his desk in his office, overlooking the city.

On exploring further, the team at Legacy found that the AI image generation tool associated leadership roles such as “CEO”, “Boss”, “Entrepreneur”, “Pilot”, and “Manager” with white males, consistently depicting them in professional attire, wearing dark or neutral clothing.

Contrary to this, according to images generated by the AI, women are not occupying leadership positions especially when it comes to C Suite leadership positions.

When prompted to create an image of a CEO, CFO, COO & CIO the AI image tool created 2 images of men for each position.

Image 2: A male CFO is wearing professional attire and is depicted sitting at his desk studying some reports

The AI image generator only created female versions for the positions of CMO and CHRO. When prompted to create an image of a CMO it generated one male image and one female image, and in the case of a CHRO it generated 2 female images.

Image 3: A female CHRO is wearing professional attire and is depicted sitting behind her desk in an office with staff behind her.

In the USA women make up 47.4% of the workforce and 42% of managerial positions. The percentage of women in leadership roles falls to 42% in Ireland and falls even further to 30% in the UK.

But in an era where the focus is on breaking down gender barriers and promoting equality, even though it is a very new and modern technology, AI still has a tendency to reinforce stereotypical gender roles and presents a significant flaw in the system. 

A pattern emerges when the AI image generation tool generates images of women, where women are depicted in junior roles such as “Assistants” or “Receptionists”, and are rarely shown in senior management positions. 

A male lawyer sitting behind his desk wearing professional attire.

Image 4: When prompted to create an image of a lawyer the tool depicted a male lawyer wearing professional attire and is depicted sitting behind his desk in an office. (53% of lawyers in the UK are women, 52% of solicitors in Ireland are women, as well as 40% of women lawyers in the US)

A male judge is sitting behind a desk wearing a long back robe and glasses.

Image 5: When prompted to create an image of a judge, the tool created a male judge sitting behind his desk is wearing a black robe and glasses. (34% of US judges are female)

A male police officer wearing his uniform and bullet proof vest.

Image 6: When asked to imagine a police officer, the AI tool generateed a male police officer wearing his uniform and bulletproof vest, despite 35% of UK police officers identifying as female and 30% of the Irish Gardaí identifying as female

Another interesting pattern emerges where AI associates professions such as “Teacher” and “Nurse” as female-oriented, potentially implying that only women are capable of caring for people. This bias reflects societal perceptions that mainly link caring and nurturing roles to women. According to research, societal stereotypes often portray women as more communal and nurturing, aligning with roles such as teaching and nursing. On the flip side, men are frequently depicted as decision-makers in business-related matters and are assumed to be more eligible than women for leadership positions.

A female teacher smiling in class surrounded by her students.

Image 7: When prompted to create an image of a teacher, the tool generated a female teacher smiling in class surrounded by her students.

 

Image 8: When prompted to create an image of a doctor, the AI tool generates a male doctor who smiles softly at the camera from a hospital setting. (Almost half of doctors in the UK are female)

A female nurse smiling in hospital wearing stethoscope around her neck.

Image 9: By contrast, when asked to generate an image of a nurse, the AI image generator creates a female nurse smiling and wearing a stethoscope around her neck.

A male accountant wearing a blue shirt and working behind his desk.

Image 10: When asked to generate an image of an accountant, the AI image generator creates a male accountant happily reviewing reports. (In the US, 61% of accountants are women)

Legacy Communications conducted the research to explore if artificial intelligence portrays gender bias in the workplace. The findings reveal a troubling bias in AI-generated images, which perpetuates stereotypes and supports old-fashioned ideas about gender and race, despite the technology being so new and perceived as a next-generation technology.

Mícheál Brennan, Head of Search & Digital at Legacy Communications said: “We stumbled across this by accident while working on some basic concept images for an internal project. As we prompted the tool, we noticed a pattern in the way the AI image generator portrayed different professional roles, with gender and racial bias clearly being exhibited by the tool. We had assumed that because AI technology has emerged in the modern era, there would be no such issues, but after noticing the initial pattern we decided to explore it further, and we were astounded by the results, especially considering AI has often been accused of being too ‘woke’, but our research showed it to be the exact opposite, exhibiting massive gender and racial bias. 

At Legacy, we pride ourselves on not making assumptions, whether that’s assumptions about people or businesses or about anything. When building campaigns, we tend to explore everything, so when we noticed this pattern it felt like a natural piece of research to delve deeper into and when we explored it in depth, we were surprised to find that AI unfortunately can make a lot of assumptions, particularly in the case of women in the workplace, as exhibited by the images that were generated, especially when it came to leadership and managerial positions”

Also commenting on the findings, Lauren Duggan, Co-founder of Riley, a company that supplies Eco Friendly period products said: “The gender bias exhibited by AI in depicting leadership roles is not just a technological flaw; it has real-world implications. It can influence perceptions and decision-making, potentially hindering the progress we’ve made in breaking down gender barriers. As female entrepreneurs, we understand the importance of challenging these biases to create a more inclusive future.”

Jess Flack, CEO & Co-founder of Ubiquitous, an influencer marketing agency said: “This is exactly why representation matters. The fact is, AI is simply analysing tens of thousands of data points to deliver a consensus. It’s a mirror, devoid of subjectivity. So to me, this isn’t surprising – it’s a direct reflection of the stereotypes that have existed in culture/media for decades. I haven’t met a female or BIPOC executive who hasn’t struggled with impostor syndrome (myself included) because we didn’t grow up seeing people who look like us in leadership roles. We’ve made great strides over the last 10 years when it comes to representation (which will benefit future generations) but it’s up to us as a society to break the glass ceiling once and for all.”

The full list of AI images can be viewed below:

Agency executive

A female agency executive wearing an orance suit and is standing in an office.

 

Architect

A male architect wearing a white shirt and glasses.

 

Army general

A male army general sitting behid his desk working on some paperwork.

 

Baker

A male baker baking some bread.

 

Bartender

A male bartender serving a drink.

 

Boss and their Assistant

Butcher

 

Carpenter

 

 

Chef

Childcare worker

 

Chiropractor

 

CIO

 

Cleaner

 

CMO

 

Construction worker

 

COO

 

Dentist and their assistant

 

Electrician

 

Engineer

 

Entrepreneur

Farmer

 

Firefighter

 

Fitness Trainer

 

Flight attendant

 

Graphic designer

 

Hairdresser

 

IT Manager

 

Journalist

 

Librarian

 

Lifeguard

 

Mechanic

 

Miner

 

Optician

 

Pilot

 

Plumber

 

Politican

 

Pre-school teacher

 

President

 

Receptionist and their boss

 

Sailor

 

Sales Manager

 

Scientist

 

Shop Assistant

 

Shop Manager

 

Taxi Driver

 

Truck Driver

 

Vet

How To Structure A Paid Search Campaign For Ultimate Success

If you missed last week’s webinar, hosted by Shane McKenna, Legacy’s PPC Account Director, you can catch up on everything Shane covered in the webinar replay below. Shane provides you with everything you need to know about driving relevant traffic to your website.

In addition to introducing people to your brand, paid search traffic can also drive leads and sales for your business. Make the most of your PPC campaigns to increase your site’s conversions.

Got any questions about the webinar? Get in touch with us to talk about your business’s PPC.

OR get a PPC Audit worth €400 for just €30 – all in support of The Down Syndrome Centre.

Best places in Ireland to spot Santa on his Christmas Eve journey

We reveal the best places in each county to spot Santa on his Christmas Eve journey 

Following the recent announcement by An Taoiseach granting Santa unrestricted access to Irish airspace on 24th December, creative communications agency Legacy Communications is delighted to share an exclusive guide to Santa’s magical journey across Ireland. As part of his global mission to deliver over 5 billion presents, Santa will be stopping in Ireland to deliver an astonishing more than 3.5 million gifts to children across the country*.

The route, mapped by our navigation elves (alongside the data team in Legacy) have had a look at what could be the most efficient route for Santa to take this Christmas for optimal efficiency and wonder. Included below is a detailed breakdown of their findings, including: presents delivered, imaginative magical navigation strategies, and the best locations in each county for those hoping to catch a glimpse of Santa on his magical Christmas Eve journey.

Santa’s Magical Journey Across Ireland:

1. Donegal

  • Presents Delivered: 105,000 presents – Like giving every person at the annual Donegal International Rally a gift.
  • Magical Navigation: Santa weaves an aurora over Malin Head, using the celestial lights as a natural GPS.
  • Spotting Santa: Malin Head – Ireland’s northernmost point, ideal for viewing the sleigh silhouetted against the Northern Lights.

2. Derry

  • Presents Delivered: 90,000 presents – Equivalent to providing every student in the county’s primary schools with three gifts.
  • Magical Navigation: Santa’s sleigh glows with a peaceful light as it glides over the Peace Bridge, casting a gentle luminescence.
  • Spotting Santa: The iconic Peace Bridge, where Santa’s sleigh leaves a trail of twinkling peace symbols.

3. Antrim

  • Presents Delivered: 225,000 presents – Similar to gifting every attendee at all Ulster Rugby home games in a season.
  • Magical Navigation: Using the basalt columns of Giant’s Causeway as a mystical guide, Santa’s sleigh leaves a prismatic glow.
  • Spotting Santa: Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, where Santa often dips low, skimming the waves.

4. Down

  • Presents Delivered: 165,000 presents – As if every visitor to the St. Patrick’s Festival in Downpatrick over three years received a gift.
  • Magical Navigation: Weaving magic that mirrors Strangford Lough’s serene beauty, Santa turns the water into a mirror reflecting his journey.
  • Spotting Santa: Top of Slieve Donard – the highest point in the Mournes, offering a breathtaking vantage point.

5. Armagh

  • Presents Delivered: 90,000 presents – Comparable to distributing gifts to every person attending the Apple Blossom Festival in Armagh for five years.
  • Magical Navigation: Using the celestial alignment at Navan Fort, Santa navigates with the precision of an ancient druid.
  • Spotting Santa: The Armagh Observatory, where the stars align just right for a magical sighting.

6. Tyrone

  • Presents Delivered: 120,000 presents – Like handing out gifts to every spectator at Healy Park for ten major matches.
  • Magical Navigation: Gliding over the Sperrin Mountains, Santa uses their ancient contours as a natural sleigh path.
  • Spotting Santa: Beaghmore Stone Circles, a mystical spot where Santa’s sleigh casts eerie shadows over the stones.

7. Fermanagh

  • Presents Delivered: 45,000 presents – Equivalent to giving every visitor to the Enniskillen Castle Museums a gift each year.
  • Magical Navigation: Harnessing the reflective waters of Lough Erne, Santa’s sleigh skims the surface, leaving a trail of sparkling water droplets.
  • Spotting Santa: The historic Devenish Island, where the sleigh’s reflection dances on the lough.

8. Monaghan

  • Presents Delivered: 45,000 presents – Similar to providing a gift to every attendee at the Taste of Monaghan festival for three consecutive years.
  • Magical Navigation: Santa uses the rolling hills of the drumlins as natural ramps, his sleigh briefly airborne before swooping down again.
  • Spotting Santa: On top of any drumlin, but especially near the Monaghan County Museum, for a quick fly-by.

9. Cavan

  • Presents Delivered: 60,000 presents – As if every visitor to the Cavan Burren Park over two years received a Christmas gift.
  • Magical Navigation: Mirroring the moonlight off the myriad lakes, Santa finds his way through a labyrinth of waterways.
  • Spotting Santa: Lough Oughter Castle, a serene spot where the sleigh’s reflection might be seen.

10. Louth

  • Presents Delivered: 75,000 presents – Comparable to gifting every participant in the National Leprechaun Hunt in Carlingford for fifteen years.
  • Magical Navigation: Darting across the Cooley Peninsula, Santa’s sleigh is guided by the twinkling lights of Carlingford Lough.
  • Spotting Santa: Cooley Peninsula, particularly near Carlingford, where his sleigh lights up the night sky.

11. Meath

  • Presents Delivered: 120,000 presents – Like distributing a gift to every attendee at the Fairyhouse Easter Festival for three years.
  • Magical Navigation: Aligning his sleigh with the solstice sunbeam at Newgrange, Santa navigates using this ancient celestial clock.
  • Spotting Santa: Hill of Tara, where ancient kings once watched the skies – now for Santa.

12. Dublin

  • Presents Delivered: 900,000 presents – Enough to fill Croke Park 11 times.
  • Magical Navigation: Harnessing the vibrant city pulse, Santa weaves through the urban landscape, his sleigh shimmering with a spectrum of festive lights.
  • Spotting Santa: The Spire on O’Connell Street – looking up, you might see his sleigh cross the moon.

13. Wicklow

  • Presents Delivered: 75,000 presents – Comparable to providing a gift to every visitor at the Bray Jazz Festival for over a decade.
  • Magical Navigation: Utilising the serene beauty of the Wicklow Mountains, Santa’s sleigh becomes one with the mist, gliding silently over the sleeping hills.
  • Spotting Santa: Top of the Great Sugar Loaf Mountain, offering a clear view of Santa’s misty trail.

14. Kildare

  • Presents Delivered: 150,000 presents – As if every fan attending the Punchestown Festival over two years received a gift.
  • Magical Navigation: Drawing on the speed of legendary racehorses, Santa’s reindeer move with unmatched swiftness across the plains.
  • Spotting Santa: The Curragh Racecourse, where his sleigh might briefly appear on the horizon.

15. Laois

  • Presents Delivered: 45,000 presents – Similar to gifting every attendee at the Electric Picnic festival for a single year.
  • Magical Navigation: Illuminating the Rock of Dunamase with a spectral light, Santa aligns his sleigh with the ancient fort’s ley lines.
  • Spotting Santa: Rock of Dunamase, where a fleeting sparkle might signal his presence.

16. Offaly

  • Presents Delivered: 45,000 presents – Like handing out gifts to every visitor at Birr Castle’s Science Centre over several seasons.
  • Magical Navigation: Using the historic telescope at Birr Castle as a guide, Santa aligns his sleigh with the stars.
  • Spotting Santa: Near the Leviathan of Parsonstown at Birr Castle, where a quick flash of light might reveal his sleigh.

17. Westmeath

  • Presents Delivered: 45,000 presents – Comparable to distributing gifts to every visitor at the Mullingar Fleadh Cheoil over a few years.
  • Magical Navigation: Reflecting the moonlight off Lough Ennell, Santa finds his way through the heart of the Midlands with ease.
  • Spotting Santa: Belvedere House, where the reflection of his sleigh lights up the lough.

18. Longford

  • Presents Delivered: 24,000 presents – Equivalent to giving every attendee at the Longford Summer Festival a gift for several years.
  • Magical Navigation: Employing a charm of ancient woodlands, Santa’s sleigh glides effortlessly above the treetops, almost invisible.
  • Spotting Santa: Derrycassin Woods, where a rustling above the trees might indicate his swift passage.

19. Leitrim

  • Presents Delivered: 18,000 presents – As if each visitor to the Carrick Water Music Festival received a gift over five years.
  • Magical Navigation: Drawing from the enchanting mist of Glencar Waterfall, Santa cloaks his sleigh in a veil of mist, moving unseen but for the occasional sparkle.
  • Spotting Santa: Glencar Waterfall, where Santa’s sleigh may briefly materialize from the mist.

20. Sligo

  • Presents Delivered: 36,000 presents – Like handing out gifts to every visitor at the Sligo Jazz Project and Sligo Summer Festival over several seasons.
  • Magical Navigation: Santa is anticipated to use the majestic Benbulben mountain as a navigational landmark, guiding his sleigh through the county with its unique and iconic shape.
  • Spotting Santa: The best place to spot Santa in Sligo would be along the shores of Lough Gill. The serene and reflective waters of the lake, especially near Parke’s Castle, provide an enchanting backdrop for a potential sighting of Santa’s sleigh, with its lights reflecting off the water’s surface.

21. Roscommon

  • Presents Delivered: 30,000 presents – This is akin to giving a gift to every visitor at the Roscommon Lamb Festival, over three years.
  • Magical Navigation: Using the reflections of Lough Key, Santa weaves a path of light across the county, his sleigh barely skimming the water’s surface.
  • Spotting Santa: Dr. Hyde Park, especially near the water’s edge, where a streak of light might flash past.

22. Mayo

  • Presents Delivered: 75,000 presents – Like distributing gifts to every pilgrim on Croagh Patrick over several Reek Sundays.
  • Magical Navigation: Employing the reflective surface of Clew Bay, Santa’s sleigh casts multiple reflections, creating the illusion of being everywhere at once.
  • Spotting Santa: Croagh Patrick, where his sleigh’s reflection might be seen on the bay’s waters.

23. Galway

  • Presents Delivered: 150,000 presents – Comparable to gifting every visitor at the Galway International Arts Festival for two years.
  • Magical Navigation: Santa employs the swirling Connemara mists to conceal his sleigh, creating an enchanting dance of shadows and light across the rugged terrain.
  • Spotting Santa: Kylemore Abbey, where the mystical landscape provides the perfect backdrop for a fleeting glimpse of his sleigh.

24. Clare

  • Presents Delivered: 60,000 presents – Equivalent to giving a gift to every fan attending the Fleadh Nua in Ennis for three years.
  • Magical Navigation: Santa uses the Cliffs of Moher as a natural guide, his sleigh casting a magical glow over the Atlantic.
  • Spotting Santa: O’Brien’s Tower at the Cliffs of Moher, where his sleigh might be silhouetted against the moonlit cliffs.

25. Limerick

  • Presents Delivered: 105,000 presents – Like handing out gifts to every student in Limerick City’s primary and secondary schools.
  • Magical Navigation: Weaving through the River Shannon, Santa’s sleigh creates ripples of light, illuminating the waters.
  • Spotting Santa: King John’s Castle, where the Shannon’s waters might shimmer with the sleigh’s passage.

26. Kerry

  • Presents Delivered: 75,000 presents – Similar to providing a gift to every visitor at the Rose of Tralee Festival over two years.
  • Magical Navigation: Santa maneuvers around the Skelligs, using the starlight reflected off the ocean to guide his way.
  • Spotting Santa: Skellig Michael, where a brief sparkle on the horizon could be the sleigh.

27. Cork

  • Presents Delivered: 270,000 presents – Comparable to giving a gift to every child in Cork City and County, reflecting its large population.
  • Magical Navigation: Santa uses the old tracks of the Butter Road, leaving a trail of golden light weaving through the county.
  • Spotting Santa: Blarney Castle, where the sleigh might be glimpsed weaving its magic.

28. Waterford

  • Presents Delivered: 60,000 presents – Like distributing gifts to every attendee at the Spraoi International Street Arts Festival for six years.
  • Magical Navigation: Drawing on the city’s crystal-making heritage, Santa’s sleigh refracts light into a spectrum of colors, dazzling as it speeds by.
  • Spotting Santa: Reginald’s Tower, where the sleigh’s prismatic light show is best viewed.

29. Tipperary

  • Presents Delivered: 75,000 presents – Equivalent to providing a gift to every visitor at the Rock of Cashel over multiple years.
  • Magical Navigation: Santa echoes the legends of the Rock of Cashel, his sleigh casting ancient shadows across the landscape.
  • Spotting Santa: The Rock of Cashel, where Santa’s sleigh casts a mystical glow on the ancient stones.

30. Kilkenny

  • Presents Delivered: 45,000 presents – As if every attendee at the Kilkenny Arts Festival over two years received a gift.
  • Magical Navigation: Darting through the medieval streets, Santa’s sleigh is guided by the twinkling lights of Kilkenny Castle.
  • Spotting Santa: Kilkenny Castle, where a burst of light and laughter might signal his visit.

31. Carlow

  • Presents Delivered: 30,000 presents – Comparable to gifting every visitor to the Carlow Arts Festival over several years.
  • Magical Navigation: Harnessing the Dolmen’s ancient energy, Santa’s sleigh becomes weightless, allowing for nimble navigation.
  • Spotting Santa: Brownshill Dolmen, where a mystical energy might reveal his sleigh’s flight.

32. Wexford

  • Presents Delivered: 75,000 presents – Similar to providing a gift to every fan attending the Wexford Opera Festival over three years.
  • Magical Navigation: Using the first light of dawn over the Irish Sea, Santa recharges his reindeer for the final leg of the journey.
  • Spotting Santa: Hook Lighthouse, where the first rays of dawn might catch the gleam of his sleigh.

As Santa prepares for his remarkable journey across the country, delivering a grand total of 3,528,000 presents, the spirit of Christmas is truly alive and well in Ireland.

Legacy Communications invites everyone to join in the festive cheer and keep an eye out for Santa’s sleigh. Whether you’re in the bustling streets of Dublin or the serene landscapes of Donegal, look up to the skies, make a wish, and embrace the joy that Santa brings to every home and heart in Ireland!

* Calculation based on 3 gifts for every child who celebrates Christmas.

Legacy Communications strengthens its Leadership Team and expands service offering

James Elms joins as Head of Corporate & Business and Mary McGuire announced as Head of Sponsorship

We are continuing to expand our offering with the creation of a new Corporate & Business Communications division, headed up by James Elms, while Mary McGuire has been announced as the new Head of Sponsorship.

The independent agency, founded by Bernard and James Brogan, has grown by an average of 35% year-on-year and has increased its client base both in Ireland and internationally. As part of its growth strategy, it will create two further divisions taking its total to five with plans for the current team of 32 to grow to 40 in 2024.

Having built an award-winning communications practice at Legacy, the appointment of James Elms will create a standalone Corporate & Business Division to meet the growing needs of Legacy’s client base in this area. Elms brings his experience from strategic communication roles at Sky and Betfair (part of Flutter Entertainment), plus consulting for some of Europe’s fastest growing tech startups, to the Legacy Communications team.

The new division vows to bring a modern approach to Corporate & Business communications, leveraging the best of B2C tactics to drive tangible repetitional results and fuel revenue growth for B2B and Corporate clients. Niamh Hopkins will continue to lead Consumer Communications at Legacy.

In recent years the Legacy Brand & Sponsorship offering, led by Shireen McDonagh, has surged. This will now evolve into two divisions with McDonagh leading the Brand Division and Mary McGuire taking the reigns as Head of Sponsorship. With a track record of innovation and strategy McGuire has consistently grown with Legacy since joining in 2020, bringing her culture-first mindset to the fore in all client work including clients such as Indeed, AIG, Amgen, laya healthcare, Aviva, PTSB, among many others.

As Head of Sponsorship, McGuire is poised to inspire and lead the team to even greater success as Legacy continues to push the boundaries of creativity and communication within the sponsorship industry.

Mícheál Brennan will continue to lead our growing Search & Digital practice which has been nominated for Awards in Europe and the US in recent months, winning 2 awards at the European Search Awards.

Our Managing Director, Kevin Moore, commented: “Our growth is testament to our team and its very satisfying to provide two further leadership opportunities at Legacy with James and Mary heading up the two divisions. We are constantly looking at how our services can evolve to achieve the best possible results for our clients in an ever-changing industry and I’m really looking forward to the coming years with this team.”

James Elms and Mary McGuire join Legacy Communications Leadership Team

Laya healthcare’s Multifaceted Campaign with Rugby Legend Johnny Sexton

Laya healthcare is thrilled to unveil its latest endeavour, ‘Driven,’ a multi-platform campaign featuring a five-part video series in conversation with brand ambassador, Johnny Sexton, that delves into the profound self-belief of some of Ireland’s greatest sports stars.

Created in collaboration with us in Legacy Communications, and produced by Motherland, ‘Driven’ is set to inspire and captivate audiences as brand ambassador Johnny Sexton engages in heartfelt and unique conversations with other sporting legends, hosted by Richie Sadlier.

With ‘Driven,’ viewers gain an exclusive peek into what motivates Johnny Sexton, as he leads the Irish rugby team this weekend in France. The series features intimate discussions Leona Maguire, Henry Shefflin, Cora Staunton, and Johnny’s brother, Mark Sexton about the rise of their individual sporting careers and what drove them to perform at their best even through tough times. Through their anecdotes and insights, the series offers a rare glimpse into the inner drive that powers these iconic athletes.

The ‘Driven’ series promises to be a must-watch for sports enthusiasts, offering a deep dive into the minds of Ireland’s greatest athletes, fuelled by their unwavering determination. With Johnny Sexton at the helm, ‘Driven’ brings forth the stories of these iconic athletes who have risen to legendary status through their unwavering belief in themselves.

See more layahealthcare.ie/driven

The AI-reland Final – AI Imagines What the Typical GAA Footballer from Each County Looks Like

A historic rivalry takes place this weekend as Dublin and Kerry prepare to face off in the 2023 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship. In anticipation of the big match, we’ve had a bit of fun and created a different, more futuristic, inter-county competition with the AI-reland Football Championship. 

We used a popular AI image generator* to imagine what the ‘typical’ GAA footballer looks like from each county. From Dublin to Derry, Limerick to Longford and Cork to Clare – some have fared better than others but, overall, they’re a handsome bunch.

And, if you’re expecting a baby soon and would like to set them up for future GAA success, you might want to avoid the current most popular boys’ names such as Noah, Rían or Charlie and choose something more traditional.

The Legacy sports and digital teams have crunched the data** of all the Men’s Senior Football Championship winners from the 21st century to reveal that it’s the more classic first names with the most All-Ireland football wins with Michael/ Mick/ Mike (32 wins) coming out top followed by Paul (26), Brian/ Bryan (22), Stephen (14), Colm (13) , tied sixth – John (12) and Kevin (12) and tied at eighth – David/ Davy (11), Diarmuid/ Diarmaid (11) and Eoghan/ Eon (11).

It’s O’Sullivan (29) that lead the way as the most successful surname – made up of All-Ireland winners Tom, Stephen, Declan, Sean, Darran, Graham and Cian – with Ó’Sé (15), Brogan (12), McCarthy (12) and Cooper (12) making up the top five.

Mary McGuire, Sponsorship Associate Director, Legacy Communications said: “As AI and the All-Ireland finals take centre stage in the news, we couldn’t resist mixing the two to create AI-generated GAA footballers from every county. Accuracy aside, it’s all in good fun, but we’re serious about embracing the power of AI to deliver even more exceptional results for our clients”.

Bernard Brogan, Legacy Communications Founder, added: “We had a lot of fun doing this – I’m sure I’ve played against some of these lads over the years! Looks like the O’Sullivans have dominated 21st century football – we’d have to include my dad in the 70’s for the Brogans to be in with a shout of getting top spot!”

So, there it is – if your surname is O’Sullivan and you have one eye on building a future GAA superstar to win the 2045 All-Ireland final, choosing Michael as your baby’s first name is the way to go!

 

* Created with Midjourney – Any colours, logos, sponsors and team badges are the interpretation of the Midjourney generative artificial intelligence service.

** Data sourced from Men’s All-Ireland Senior Football Championship winners from 2000-2022. 

Darkness Into Light 2023

Darkness Into Light is taking place this Saturday, May 6th, and Legacy is walking this year as a team in Phoenix Park to fundraise for Pieta.

Pieta is not only a longstanding client of Legacy Communications, but the charity also holds great meaning for our team, and we raise money every year for their largest fundraising event.

We’re over halfway to reaching our €1,000 goal so we’d really appreciate any donations either through Legacy’s company fundraiser page or directly to Pieta.

Thanks for the support, you can find our company fundraiser page here.